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  1. Immigration to Canada Trending Down, New Data Shows

    By cvf, 05/24/2024


    The number of new permanent residents to Canada continued its downward trend for the second consecutive month in March after the high number of new arrivals in January.
    That was a repeat of the same pattern seen early last year. 
    Monthly immigration to Canada slid another 11 per cent in March this year, down to 34,785 new permanent residents from the 39,090 in February and the 11-month high of 47,745 new permanent residents who arrived in January this year, the latest data from Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) reveals.
    The 11 percentage point slide in March this year mimics a trend in early 2023, a year which nonetheless closed with record-breaking immigration.
    After hitting a high of 50,945 new permanent residents to Canada in January last year, monthly immigration levels tapered off over the following three months to a mere 29,565 new permanent residents in April 2023.
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    Immigration levels to Canada in the first quarter of this year have been 16.4 per cent lower overall, with 121,620 new permanent residents arriving in the country during those three months, than during the same period in 2023 when Canada welcomed 145,495 new permanent residents.
    With three months of softer permanent immigration numbers than in 2023, Canada welcomed 23,875 fewer new permanent residents in the first quarter of this year, a figure roughly the size of the population of the Yukon’s capital city.
    Despite this downward-trending monthly immigration, projecting out from the first three months of this year to the rest of the year would result in 486,480 new permanent residents to Canada this year, up 3.1 per cent from last year’s record-breaking level.
    That level of immigration would also allow Canada to almost perfectly hit its target under the 2024-2026 Immigration Levels Plan.
    Canada is planning to welcome 485,000 new permanent residents this year, 500,000 in 2025 and then hold the line on immigration in 2026 with another 500,000 newcomers for a total of 1.485 million immigrants to the country over those three years.
    “Following the trajectory of the 2023 – 2025 plan, Canada aims to welcome 485,000 new permanent residents in 2024, 500,000 in 2025 and plateau at 500,000 in 2026,” notes the IRCC on its website.
    “This plan prioritizes economic growth, and supports family reunification, while responding to humanitarian crises and recognizing the rapid growth in immigration in recent years.”
    Canada’s biggest province by population, Ontario, was the most popular destination for newcomers in the first quarter of this year with 52,720 new permanent residents choosing to settle there during those three months.
    That means the central Canadian province was the destination of choice for more than 43.3 per cent of all immigrants to Canada during the first quarter of this year.
    New Brunswick Saw The Biggest Drop In Monthly Immigration In March
    Economic programs accounted for almost 54.5 per cent of all new permanent residents coming to Ontario during the first quarter. 
    They included the: 
    Ontario Immigrant Nominee Program (OINP),  Agri-Food Immigration Pilot (AFIP),  Canadian Experience Class (CEC),  Caregiver programs,  Rural and Northern Immigration Pilot (RNIP),  Federal Skilled Trades (FST) and  Federal Skilled Worker (FSW) programs, the Start-Up Visa (SUV) and  Self-Employed Persons (SEP) programs, Temporary Resident to Permanent Resident Pathway  Those programs helped 28,710 new permanent residents arrive in Ontario during those three months.
    Another 12,960 new permanent residents arrived in Ontario through family sponsorships and 9,525 came to that province through Canada’s refugee and protected persons programs from January through to the end of March.
    The other provinces and territories attracted the following number of new permanent residents each during those three months.
    Newfoundland and Labrador – 1,405 Prince Edward Island – 1,330 Nova Scotia – 3,995 New Brunswick – 3,995 Quebec – 13,355 Manitoba – 5,680 Saskatchewan – 5,610 Alberta – 15,360 British Columbia – 17,745 Yukon – 295 Northwest Territories – 115 Nunavut – 10 Across the country, New Brunswick was the province that saw the biggest drop in monthly immigration  in March with the number of arrivals of new permanent residents falling by 28.9 per cent. Among the country’s three territories, the Yukon saw a monthly immigration drop of 31.6 per cent in March compared to the previous month.
    So far this year, Nunavut has welcomed only 10 new permanent residents.
    Canada operates a two-tier immigration system which allows foreign nationals to gain their permanent residency through the federal Express Entry system’s FSW, FST, and CEC programs and as well as the Provincial Nominee Programs (PNP) of the 10 Canadian provinces.
    Temporary immigration to Canada, which skyrocketed during the pandemic, is expected to come under an immigration levels plan in September, Immigration Minister Marc Miller has announced.
    The post Immigration to Canada Trending Down, New Data Shows appeared first on Canada Immigration and Visa Information. Canadian Immigration Services and Free Online Evaluation..
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  2. New Immigrants Catching Up to Canadians in Findings Jobs

    By cvf, 05/24/2024


    Newcomers to Canada are catching up to Canadians in finding jobs post-COVID, with the employment rate of new immigrants growing by 12.7 percentage points compared to 4.2 for Canadian workers between November 2010 and November 2022.  
    Details from the most recent Labor Force survey revealed that the smallest gap between the employment rate for the two groups was in December 2021, when newcomers had a rate of 79.6 per cent and Canadian-born workers were at 85.8 percent.  
    Today, the employment rate for newcomers is 76.3 per cent and that for Canadians is 85.9 per cent, which is still a significantly reduced gap between the two groups.  
    In 2006, for example, the gap between the two demographics was close to 17 percent.  
    Newcomers are defined as those who came to Canada and were granted permanent residence in the last five years.  
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    According to a Statistics Canada study from February 2024 – as reported by The Hub – the relative growth in the employment rate of this demographic is due to three factors: 
    The expansion of the two-step immigration process in which more Canadian economic immigrants are being selected from the pre-existing pool of temporary foreign workers. The number of new Canadians who had work permits before obtaining their Canada PR rose significantly from 19 percent in 2010 to 36 percent in 2022.   Changes to Canada’s immigration selection process since 2010, including the Express Entry, which places greater emphasis on Canada work experience, language proficiency, and education.   The strong Canadian labor market, which is underscored by low unemployment and caused a rise in demand for university-educated immigrants.   Statistics Canada data released earlier in 2023 showcased a clear correlation between the employment rate of core working-age immigrants and the amount of time that has passed since they came to Canada.  
    According to this report, the longer a core working-age immigrant (25-to-54-year-old) stayed in Canada, the higher their employment rate was.  
    Watch Video
      More so, the employment rate figures in this report were the highest they had been since 2019 for those who had been in Canada between 5-10 years and for at least 10 years.  
    The figure did, however, witness a fall between 2022 and 2023 for those who came to Canada five or fewer years ago.  
    The employment rate for Canadians in April 2024 held steady at 61.4%, after six back-to-back declines. However, employment increased by 90,000 (+0.4%).  
    These employment gains were driven by part-time employment (+50,000; +1.4%), and increased in professional, scientific and technical services (+26,000; +1.3%), accommodation and food services (+24,000; +2.2%), health care and social assistance (+17,000; +0.6%) and natural resources (+7,700; +2.3%), while it fell in utilities (-5,000; -3.1%). 
    Provincially, employment increased in Ontario (+25,000; +0.3%), British Columbia (+23,000; +0.8%), Quebec (+19,000 +0.4%) and New Brunswick (+7,800; +2.0%) in April. It was little changed in the other provinces.
    The post New Immigrants Catching Up to Canadians in Findings Jobs appeared first on Canada Immigration and Visa Information. Canadian Immigration Services and Free Online Evaluation..
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  3. BC PNP Invites 75 Candidates In New Immigration Draw Majoring On Tech

    By cvf, 05/23/2024


    British Columbia has issued at least 75 invitations in a new draw through the British Columbia Provincial Nominee Program (BC PNP).
    The majority of the invitations, 50 in total, were issued to skilled workers and international graduates with tech experience in the May 22 draw. The required minimum score was 122.
    A further 9 invitations were allocated specifically to skilled workers and international graduates in the childcare sector, requiring a minimum score of 93 points.
    Similarly, another 9 invitations were reserved for construction workers who met a minimum score of 93 points.
    Healthcare professionals received 10 invitations extended to skilled workers and international graduates, each needing a minimum score of 100 points to qualify.
    Additionally, there was a specialized draw for veterinary care workers, where fewer than 5 invitations were issued to maintain the privacy of the recipients. The minimum score required for this category was 80 points.
    This draw highlights BC PNP’s targeted approach to attracting skilled talent across various essential sectors.
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    DateCategoryMinimum ScoreInvitations IssuedDescription22-05-24  Skilled Worker, International Graduate12250Tech935Childcare939Construction10010Healthcare80<5Veterinary care Video:
    The post BC PNP Invites 75 Candidates In New Immigration Draw Majoring On Tech appeared first on Canada Immigration and Visa Information. Canadian Immigration Services and Free Online Evaluation..
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  4. How Canada Processes Work Permit Applications for Regulated Occupations Such As Doctors  

    By cvf, 05/23/2024


    The assessment of a work permit application in Canada not only requires that officers be satisfied with the foreign national’s ability to perform the work being sought, but also with the foreign national’s credentials to perform that work.  
    In Canada, the latter part of that requirement is true for regulated occupations – jobs that require a licence or certificate of qualification – like doctors. 
    For the issuance of a work permit, Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) officers or Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) officers need to ensure the worker has the required education, certification, training or licensing to practise in a regulated occupation in Canada. 
    If the applicant is not in Canada and is not able to go through the process to meet the requirements to practise their occupation or trade, IRCC or CBSA – before issuing a work permit – will be responsible for assessing the likelihood that the application, on a balance of probabilities, qualifies or has taken steps toward obtaining the right certification or licensing after coming to Canada.  
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    There are two possible case scenarios that could transpire while processing work permit applications for regulated occupations: 
    1. Applicant has certification or license 
    If the applicant has been in Canada previously with an authorization to work and had been given the required certification or license, an officer can be put to review the document to determine whether they are satisfied that the individual is able to perform the requisite work. 
    2. Applicant does not have certification or license  
    In this scenario, if it has been determined that the occupation is regulated, the processing officer needs to be satisfied the foreigner has obtained the right license or can obtain it within a short period after coming to Canada.  
    A reasonable period herein is usually within 4 months (that is, qualifying after a maximum of one semester of studies), as the expectation is that the worker performs the work immediately upon coming to Canada.  
    However, the lack of required licensing or certification is not an immediate disqualifier for a work permit, as some occupations exist where the testing can only be completed, or licensing can only be obtained, while the worker is physically in Canada.  
    For some other occupations (architects, surveyors, etc.), a candidate’s work can be put for review, approval, and signing-off by a registered (licensed) professional until the foreign national passes licensing requirements.
    Watch Video
      When the review of an application is being done, one of the following guidelines can be used by officers if the workers lack license or certification:  
    1. Training or testing is part of the employment offer: If the employer says in the job offer that they (employer) will fund the training or testing and pay a wage during the training/testing period, the employee needs to show proof that they are scheduled for the required training or testing and can complete it in a reasonably short period after coming to Canada and that they have the language skills to succeed in their training. 
    2. Lower-level occupation: A worker may be applying to enter Canada in a lower-level occupation and then complete their training or testing after arrival so that they later meet the requirements of the intended level of work, at which point they will apply for a new work permit in the higher-level occupation. 
    An officer needs to be satisfied that the worker will have the ability to perform the work sought as per paragraph R200(3)(a). If they do not have a required licence or cannot obtain it within a reasonable period of time, the officer may refuse the work permit. 
    Approvals or Refusals 
    In case the processing officer is satisfied that the foreign national is likely to obtain the license/certificate of qualification required, and the other conditions are met, they may approve the application and impose a condition under subparagraph R185(b)(iv).  
    Contrarily, if the officer is not satisfied that the applicant has the language skills to succeed, that the training is available and will take place within a reasonable period of time post entry, or that funds are not available to pay for training, they have reasonable grounds to believe that the foreign national will not be able to perform the work sought.  
    The post How Canada Processes Work Permit Applications for Regulated Occupations Such As Doctors   appeared first on Canada Immigration and Visa Information. Canadian Immigration Services and Free Online Evaluation..
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  5. Canada to Offer Citizenship Pathway for Undocumented Migrants 

    By cvf, 05/23/2024


    The federal government said that it is seeking a pathway for those lacking official status to stay in Canada, while also speeding up deportation procedures.  
    It is set to be part of a Citizenship Bill announcement being made by Immigration Minister Marc Miller on Thursday, May 23.
    “People who aren’t here regularly need to be supported and taken care of,” Prime Minister Justin Trudeau told reporters in Winnipeg recently.
    “There needs to be either a pathway towards regularization and citizenship, which I know the (immigration) minister is working on. In some cases, we need to accelerate deportation proceedings.” 
    The announcement was delivered by Trudeau at Elwick Community School in Winnipeg on May 17. This was in response to advocates for gender minorities claiming that the lack of a regularization program is causing those without official status to get exploited. 
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    An undocumented migrant is an individual who has no authorization to reside and/or work in Canada. Some may have overstayed their temporary status, while others may have remained in Canada following a rejected asylum claim. 
    There is no accurate tally of the number of these individuals living in Canada, although academic estimates lie between 20,000 and 500,000 persons.  
    In October 2023, IRCC said that it continues to explore options to regularize those people who lack immigration status and have been contributing socially and economically to Canada’s communities.  
    It also said that it values its ongoing dialogue with stakeholder organizations, such as the Canadian Council for Refugees and the Migrant Rights Network, to ensure that the voices of those with lived experience are accounted for.  
    Previously, IRCC has put in place certain regularization initiatives, such as the Guardian Angels temporary public policy. This PR pathway was put in place during COVID for pending and failed refugee claimants who worked in patient care, and their family members.  
    More than 8,500 individuals benefited from this pathway. 
    Watch Video
      Right now, IRCC has in effect the temporary Public Policy for Out-of-Status Construction Workers in the Greater Toronto Area. This policy recognizes the economic contributions of workers in the construction industry while addressing vulnerabilities associated with their lack of status. 
    As of August 31, 2023, 1,029 individuals have been admitted, of which 441 were principal applicants and 588 were dependents. 
    In late 2021, the Liberal government pledged to “explore ways of regularizing status for undocumented workers who are contributing to Canadian communities.” However, no timeline was put on when this would take effect.  
    The Immigration Minister’s office, as per CityNews, said on Friday that it is on track to present a proposal to Miller’s fellow cabinet minister prior to Parliament rising for its summer break in June.  
    “There’s a balance in making sure that the integrity of our immigration system holds,” Trudeau said. 
    “That’s one of the reasons why Canadians are, unlike so many other countries in the world, continuing to be positive towards immigration — because our immigration system is rigorous.” 
    The post Canada to Offer Citizenship Pathway for Undocumented Migrants  appeared first on Canada Immigration and Visa Information. Canadian Immigration Services and Free Online Evaluation..
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